Mobile-Canon Timeline

This is a comprehensive summary of all events that occurred in the mobile game canon universe (L/M) as depicted in the series of mobile games produced by Ludia, Inc. The dates and occurrences of some events are based on the film canon (S/F), from which much of the mobile canon is derived. It also includes real-life events which are significant to the mobile canon in order to provide context.

Cambrian Period: Fortunian Age

  • 541 MYA: Earliest known jellyfish (Medusozoa) have evolved by this time.
  • 535 MYA: Earliest known jawless fish (Agnatha) have evolved by this time.

Cambrian Period: Wuliuan Age

  • 508 MYA: Anomalocaris evolves and becomes extinct around this time.

Middle Ordovician Period: Dapingian Age

  • 470 MYA: Orthoceras and Cameroceras have evolved by this time.

Middle Ordovician Period: Darriwilian Age

  • 467.3 MYA: Earliest known sea scorpions (Eurypterida) have evolved by this time.

Late Ordovician Period: Sandbian Age

  • 458 MYA: Orthoceras becomes extinct after this time.

Silurian Period: Ludfordian Age

  • 425 MYA: Cameroceras becomes extinct after this time.

Early Devonian Period: Pragian Age

  • 409 MYA: Earliest known ammonites (Ammonoidea) have evolved by this time.
  • 407.7 MYA: Edestus has evolved by this time.

Early Devonian Period: Emsian Age

  • 395 MYA: Earliest amphibians formerly classified within Labyrinthodontia.

Late Devonian Period: Frasnian Age

  • 382 MYA: Dunkleosteus has evolved by this time.

Late Devonian Period: Famennian Age

  • 365 MYA: Ichthyostega has evolved by this time. Acanthostega evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 360 MYA: Hyneria evolves and becomes extinct around this time. Ichthyostega becomes extinct after this time.

Carboniferous Period: Tournaisian Age

  • 358.9 MYA: Orthacanthus has evolved by this time.
  • 358 MYA: Dunkleosteus becomes extinct after this time.

Carboniferous Period: Visean Age

  • 345 MYA: Arthropleura has evolved by this time.
  • 331 MYA: Proterogyrinus has evolved by this time.

Carboniferous Period: Serpukhovian Age

  • 330 MYA: Rhizodus has evolved by this time.

Carboniferous Period: Bashkirian Age

  • 323 MYA: Proterogyrinus becomes extinct after this time.

Carboniferous Period: Kasimovian Age

  • 306.5 MYA: Limnoscelis has evolved by this time.
  • 306 MYA: Diplocaulus and Ophiacodon have evolved by this time.

Carboniferous Period: Gzhelian Age

  • 303.4 MYA: Edaphosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 300 MYA: Edestus and Rhizodus become extinct after this time.
  • 299 MYA: PrionosuchusCladophlebis, and Eryops have evolved by this time.

Permian Period: Sakmarian Age

  • 295 MYA: Arthropleura and Limnoscelis become extinct after this time. Dimetrodon has evolved by this time.

Permian Period: Artinskian Age

  • 290 MYA: Helicoprion has evolved by this time.
  • 285 MYA: Secodontosaurus has evolved by this time.

Permian Period: Kungurian Age

  • 280 MYA: Ophiacodon becomes extinct after this time.
  • 278 MYA: Eryops becomes extinct after this time.

Permian Period: Roadian Age

  • 272.5 MYA: Edaphosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 272.3 MYA: Secodontosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 272 MYA: Dimetrodon and Prionosuchus become extinct after this time.

Permian Period: Capitanian Age

  • 265 MYA: ScutosaurusInostrancevia, and Moschops have evolved by this time. Arctops evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 260 MYA: Hybodus has evolved by this time. Moschops becomes extinct after this time.

Permian Period: Wuchiapingian Age

  • 255 MYA: Diplocaulus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 254 MYA: Scutosaurus becomes extinct after this time.

Permian Period: Changhsingian Age

  • 252.3 MYA: InostranceviaOrthacanthus, and Helicoprion become extinct after this time. They are among the victims of Earth’s most devastating mass extinction event, in which 83% of all genera alive at the time became extinct. The enormous climatic change that caused this extinction event was driven by greenhouse gas release from marine environments, volcanic activity, and possibly multiple bolide impact events.

Early Triassic Period: Induan Age

  • 251.9 MYA: Last known sea scorpions (Eurypterida) have become extinct.

Middle Triassic Period: Anisian Age

  • 247.2 MYA: Mastodonsaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 247 MYA: Microposaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 242 MYA: Prestosuchus has evolved by this time. Nundasuchus evolves and becomes extinct around this time. Microposaurus becomes extinct after this time.

Middle Triassic Period: Ladinian Age

  • 238 MYA: Mastodonsaurus becomes extinct after this time.

Late Triassic Period: Carnian Age

  • 237 MYA: Shonisaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 235 MYA: The earliest known nautilus (Nautilidae) has evolved by this time, as has Shastasaurus. Prestosuchus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 228 MYA: Henodus has evolved by this time.

Late Triassic Period: Norian Age

  • 227 MYA: Metoposaurus has evolved by this time. Shonisaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 226 MYA: Mosquitoes (Culicidae) may have evolved by this time.
  • 225.42 MYA: Unaysaurus evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 221 MYA: Postosuchus has evolved by this time.
  • 220 MYA: Henodus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 216.5 MYA: Metoposaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 210 MYA: Psephoderma evolves and becomes extinct around this time. Eudimorphodon has evolved by this time.

Late Triassic Period: Rhaetian Age

  • 205.6 MYA: Shastasaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 203 MYA: Postosuchus and Eudimorphodon become extinct after this time.

Early Jurassic Period: Hettangian Age

  • 200 MYA: Temnodontosaurus and Schmeissneria have evolved by this time.
  • 200 MYA: A nautilus hatches in an environment that will be isolated from the rest of the world for two hundred million years. Through unknown means, it does not age naturally after reaching adulthood. This particular nautilus manages to avoid disease and predators until its environment reconnects with the outside world.
  • 199.6 MYA: Plesiosaurus has evolved by this time.

Early Jurassic Period: Sinemurian Age

  • 195 MYA: Dimorphodon has evolved by this time.
  • 193 MYA: Dilophosaurus evolved and became extinct around this time.
  • 190 MYA: Dimorphodon becomes extinct after this time.

Early Jurassic Period: Pliensbachian Age

  • 183 MYA: Rhomaleosaurus has evolved by this time.

Early Jurassic Period: Toarcian Age

  • 182.7 MYA: Hauffiosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 180.7 MYA: Hauffiosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 175.6 MYA: Plesiosaurus and Rhomaleosaurus become extinct after this time.
  • 175 MYA: Temnodontosaurus becomes extinct after this time.

Middle Jurassic Period: Bajocian Age

  • 170 MYA: Schmeissneria becomes extinct after this time.

Middle Jurassic Period: Bathonian Age

  • 167 MYA: Metriorhynchus and Suchodus have evolved by this time.
  • 166 MYA: MonolophosaurusMegalosaurus, and Liopleurodon have evolved by this time.
  • 165 MYA: Proceratosaurus evolved and became extinct around this time. Ophthalmosaurus and Leedsichthys have evolved by this time.

Late Jurassic Period: Oxfordian Age

  • 160.89 MYA: Darwinopterus has evolved by this time.
  • 160.25 MYA: Darwinopterus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 160 MYA: MetriacanthosaurusGuanlong, and Tuojiangosaurus evolve and become extinct around this time. OphthalmosaurusSuchodus, and Monolophosaurus become extinct after this time.

Late Jurassic Period: Kimmeridgian Age

  • 159 MYA: Shunosaurus evolved and became extinct around this time.
  • 157 MYA: Dakosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 156.3 MYA: Brontosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 155.7 MYA: Pliosaurus and Scaphognathus have evolved by this time.
  • 155 MYA: AllosaurusDryosaurus, and Stegosaurus have evolved by this time. Metriorhynchus and Liopleurodon become extinct after this time.
  • 154 MYA: DiplodocusPlesiosuchus, and Brachiosaurus have evolved by this time.
  • 153 MYA: Ceratosaurus and Tanycolagreus have evolved by this time. Brachiosaurus becomes extinct after this time. Supersaurus evolves and becomes extinct around this time.

Late Jurassic Period: Tithonian Age

  • 152.1 MYA: Ostafrikasaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 152 MYA: Diplodocus and Leedsichthys become extinct after this time. Apatosaurus has evolved by this time. Kentrosaurus evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 151 MYA: Apatosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 150.8 MYA: CompsognathusRhamphorhynchus, and Pterodactylus have evolved by this time. Scaphognathus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 150 MYA: AllosaurusTanycolagreusMiragaia, and Stegosaurus become extinct after this time. Giraffatitan and Geosaurus have evolved by this time.
  • 149 MYA: Plesiosuchus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 148.5 MYA: Pterodactylus and Rhamphorhynchus become extinct after this time.
  • 148 MYA: Ceratosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 147 MYA: Pliosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 146.8 MYA: Brontosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 145 MYA: GiraffatitanOstafrikasaurus, and Dryosaurus become extinct after this time.

Early Cretaceous Period: Berriasian Age

  • 140 MYA: Compsognathus becomes extinct after this time. LeptocleidusBajadasaurus, and Coloborhynchus have evolved by this time.

Early Cretaceous Period: Valanginian Age

  • 139 MYA: Utahraptor has evolved by this time.
  • 137 MYA: Dakosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 136 MYA: Geosaurus and Coloborhynchus become extinct after this time.
  • 134.6 MYA: Utahraptor becomes extinct after this time.
  • 134 MYA: Bajadasaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 133 MYA: Sarcosuchus has evolved by this time.

Early Cretaceous Period: Hauterivian Age

  • 132 MYA: Wuerhosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 130 MYA: Baryonyx and Concavenator have evolved by this time. Pelecanimimus evolves and becomes extinct around this time.

Early Cretaceous Period: Barremian Age

  • 129.4 MYA: Amargasaurus and Dsungaripterus have evolved by this time.
  • 129 MYA: Wuerhosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 126 MYA: Iguanodon has evolved by this time. Concavenator becomes extinct after this time.
  • 125 MYA: Baryonyx and Leptocleidus become extinct after this time. Suchomimus has evolved by this time.
  • 124.6 MYA: Yutyrannus evolves and becomes extinct around this time.

Early Cretaceous Period: Aptian Age

  • 122.46 MYA: Amargasaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 120.5 MYA: Labyrinthodontia is considered extinct. They are survived by amniote and amphibian descendants.
  • 120 MYA: Kronosaurus has evolved by this time. Koolasuchus evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 118 MYA: Tyrannotitan evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 116 MYA: Acrocanthosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 115 MYA: Deinonychus and Tenontosaurus have evolved by this time. Umoonasaurus evolves and becomes extinct around this time.

Early Cretaceous Period: Albian Age

  • 113 MYA: Sagaria has evolved by this time. Iguanodon and Dsungaripterus become extinct after this time.
  • 112 MYA: Sonorasaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 112.6 MYA: Enchodus has evolved by this time.
  • 112 MYA: Suchomimus and Sarcosuchus become extinct after this time. SpinosaurusOnchopristisTupuxuara, and Xiphactinus have evolved by this time. TapejaraTupandactylus, Tropeognathus, and Ouranosaurus evolve and become extinct around this time.
  • 110 MYA: Acrocanthosaurus becomes extinct after this time. Irritator has evolved by this time. Ornithocheirus evolves and becomes extinct around thsi time.
  • 108 MYA: Deinonychus and Tenontosaurus become extinct after this time.
  • 105 MYA: Pterodaustro evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 102 MYA: Segnosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 100 MYA: Sagaria becomes extinct after this time.

Late Cretaceous Period: Cenomanian Age

  • 100.5 MYA: CarcharodontosaurusNodosaurus, and Baculites have evolved by this time.
  • 100 MYA: Kronosaurus becomes extinct after this time. Gillicus has evolved by this time.
  • 98 MYA: Giganotosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 97 MYA: Giganotosaurus and Nodosaurus become extinct after this time.
  • 96.7 MYA: Eolambia evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 96.2 MYA: Argentinosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 95 MYA: Kaprosuchus and Alanqa evolve and become extinct around this time.
  • 93.9 MYA: Carcharodontosaurus becomes extinct after this time. Bananogmius has evolved by this time.

Late Cretaceous Period: Turonian Age

  • 93.5 MYA: Spinosaurus becomes extinct after this time. Dolichorhynchops has evolved by this time.
  • 93 MYA: Sonorasaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 92.19 MYA: Argentinosaurus becomes extinct after this time.

Late Cretaceous Period: Coniacian Age

  • 89.8 MYA: Bananogmius becomes extinct after this time. Protosphyraena has evolved by this time.
  • 86.5 MYA: Tylosaurus has evolved by this time.

Late Cretaceous Period: Santonian Age

  • 86.3 MYA: Tusoteuthis has evolved by this time.
  • 86 MYA: Pteranodon has evolved by this time. Segnosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 85 MYA: Bonitasaura evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 84.9 MYA: Scolosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 84.5 MYA: Pteranodon becomes extinct after this time.
  • 84 MYA: Platecarpus has evolved by this time.

Late Cretaceous Period: Campanian Age

  • 83.6 MYA: Prognathodon has evolved by this time.
  • 83.5 MYA: Styxosaurus has evolved by this time. Protostega evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 82 MYA: Deinosuchus has evolved by this time.
  • 81.5 MYA: Zhejiangopterus evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 81 MYA: Platecarpus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 80.6 MYA: Lythronax has evolved by this time.
  • 80.5 MYA: Styxosaurus becomes extinct after this time. Elasmosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 80.21 MYA: Archelon has evolved by this time.
  • 80 MYA: Trinacromerum evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 79.9 MYA: Lythronax becomes extinct after this time.
  • 77.5 MYA: Troodon, or the dinosaurs once considered Troodons, evolved by this time.
  • 77 MYA: Corythosaurus has evolved by this time. Mauisaurus evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 76.7 MYA: Maiasaura evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 76.6 MYA: Gorgosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 76.5 MYA: Parasaurolophus and Ornithomimus have evolved by this time.
  • 76.4 MYA: Euoplocephalus has evolved by this time.
  • 76 MYA: Nasutoceratops has evolved by this time.
  • 75.7 MYA: Corythosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 75.6 MYA: Euoplocephalus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 75.5 MYA: Troodon, or the dinosaurs once considered Troodons, became extinct after this time. Nasutoceratops becomes extinct after this time.
  • 75.1 MYA: Gorgosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 75 MYA: Tylosaurus becomes extinct after this time. Velociraptor has evolved by this time. Dreadnoughtus evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 74.5 MYA: Einiosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 74.21 MYA: Archelon becomes extinct after this time.
  • 74 MYA: Einiosaurus becomes extinct after this time. Antarctopelta has evolved by this time.
  • 73.5 MYA: Sinoceratops evolves and becomes extinct around this time. Pachyrhinosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 73 MYA: Deinosuchus and Parasaurolophus become extinct after this time. Edmontosaurus has evolved by this time.
  • 72 MYA: Tusoteuthis becomes extinct after this time.

Late Cretaceous Period: Maastrichtian Age

  • 72.1 MYA: Elasmosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 72 MYA: Carnotaurus has evolved by this time. Cladophlebis becomes extinct after this time.
  • 71 MYA: Velociraptor becomes extinct around this time. Albertosaurus and Deinochierus have evolved by this time.
  • 70.6 MYA: HainosaurusPlotosaurus, and Kaiwhekea have evolved by this time. Dolichorhynchops and Scolosaurus become extinct after this time. Pyroraptor evolves and becomes extinct around this time.
  • 70 MYA: MajungasaurusAerotitan, TherizinosaurusZalmoxes, Pachycephalosaurus, and Mosasaurus have evolved by this time. GallimimusArambourgiania, and Tarbosaurus evolved and became extinct around this time. Antarctopelta becomes extinct after this time.
  • 69.9 MYA: Carnotaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 69 MYA: Kaiwhekea and Deinochierus become extinct after this time.
  • 68.5 MYA: Pachyrhinosaurus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 68 MYA: Albertosaurus and Hainosaurus become extinct after this time. AnkylosaurusTyrannosaurusStygimoloch, Quetzalcoatlus, Dracorex, Torosaurus, and Triceratops have evolved by this time.
  • 67 MYA: Rajasaurus evolved and became extinct around this time.
  • 66.5 MYA: Ornithomimus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 66 MYA: Hatzegopteryx evolved by this time.
  • 66 MYA: A mass extinction event occurs when a large bolide (likely a comet or asteroid) strikes the southwestern Caribbean, near what is now the Yucatán Peninsula. Extreme volcanic activity contributes to the extinction event. All remaining non-avian dinosaur species, all of the pterosaurs, nearly all marine reptiles, and many species of other organisms become extinct. Overall, this extinction event causes the death of 75% of all species living at the time.

Paleogene Period: Selandian Age

  • 60 MYA: Titanoboa and Carbonemys have evolved by this time.

Paleogene Period: Thanetian Age

  • 58 MYA: Titanoboa and Carbonemys become extinct after this time.
  • 57 MYA: Coryphodon has evolved by this time.

Paleogene Period: Ypresian Age

  • 56 MYA: Gastornis has evolved by this time.
  • 51.8 MYA: Mesonyx has evolved by this time.
  • 48 MYA: Andrewsarchus has evolved by this time.
  • 47 MYA: Urtinotherium has evolved by this time.
  • 46 MYA: Coryphodon has evolved by this time.

Paleogene Period: Lutetian Age

  • 45 MYA: Uintatherium has evolved by this time. Gastornis becomes extinct after this time.
  • 42 MYA: Hyaenodon has evolved by this time.
  • 41.3 MYA: Basilosaurus has evolved by this time.

Paleogene Period: Bartonian Age

  • 41 MYA: Andrewsarchus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 38 MYA: Megacerops has evolved by this time.

Paleogene Period: Priabonian Age

  • 37.2 MYA: Enchodus becomes extinct after this time. Entelodon has evolved by this time.
  • 37 MYA: Uintatherium becomes extinct after this time. Moeritherium and Gigantophis have evolved by this time.
  • 36 MYA: Arsinoitherium has evolved by this time.
  • 35 MYA: Sarkastodon evolves and becomes extinct around this time. MoeritheriumGigantophis, and Urtinotherium become extinct after this time.
  • 34 MYA: Paraceratherium has evolved by this time.

Paleogene Period: Rupelian Age

  • 33.9 MYA: Basilosaurus and Megacerops become extinct after this time. Archaeotherium has evolved by this time.
  • 29 MYA: Peltephilus and Daeodon have evolved by this time.
  • 28.6 MYA: Chalicotherium has evolved by this time.
  • 28.4 MYA: Entelodon becomes extinct after this time.

Paleogene Period: Chattian Age

  • 27 MYA: Arsinoitherium becomes extinct after this time.
  • 24.8 MYA: Archaeotherium becomes extinct after this time.
  • 23 MYA: Mesonyx becomes extinct after this time.

Paleogene Period: Aquitanian Age

  • 23.03 MYA: Megistotherium has evolved by this time.
  • 23 MYA: The megalodon (Carcharocles megalodon) has evolved by this time. Paraceratherium becomes extinct after this time.
  • 21 MYA: Gryposuchus has evolved by this time.
  • 20.6 MYA: Aepycamelus has evolved by this time.
  • 20.4 MYA: Purussaurus has evolved by this time.

Neogene Period: Burdigalian Age

  • 20 MYA: Phorusrhacos has evolved by this time.
  • 19 MYA: Daeodon becomes extinct after this time.
  • 16.9 MYA: Amphicyon has evolved by this time.
  • 16 MYA: The earliest known great white shark is believed to have evolved by this time.
  • 15.9 MYA: Hyaenodon becomes extinct after this time.

Neogene Period: Langhian Age

  • 15 MYA: Kelenken evolves and becomes extinct around this time. Platybelodon has evolved by this time.

Neogene Period: Serravallian Age

  • 13 MYA: Phorusrhacos becomes extinct after this time.

Neogene Period: Tortonian Age

  • 11.61 MYA: Megistotherium becomes extinct after this time.
  • 11.6 MYA: Peltephilus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 10.3 MYA: Synthetoceras has evolved by this time.
  • 10 MYA: Platybelodon becomes extinct after this time.
  • 9.9 MYA: Livyatan has evolved by this time.
  • 9 MYA: Thylacosmilus and Amebelodon have evolved by this time.
  • 8.9 MYA: Livyatan becomes extinct after this time.
  • 7.2 MYA: Odobenocetops has evolved by this time.

Neogene Period: Messinian Age

  • 7 MYA: Macrauchenia has evolved by this time.
  • 6.8 MYA: Gryposuchus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 6 MYA: Amebelodon becomes extinct after this time.

Neogene Period: Zanclean Age

  • 5.3 MYA: Synthetoceras and Purussaurus becomes extinct after this time. The mastodon (Mammut) and Eucladoceros have evolved by this time.
  • 5 MYA: Megatherium has evolved by this time.
  • 4.9 MYA: Aepycamelus becomes extinct after this time. Eremotherium has evolved by this time.
  • 4 MYA: Deinotherium has evolved by this time.
  • 3.6 MYA: Odobenocetops, the megalodon (Carcharocles megalodon), and Chalicotherium become extinct after this time. The woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis) has evolved by this time.

Neogene Period: Piacenzian Age

  • 3 MYA: Thylacosmilus becomes extinct after this time. Castoroides has evolved by this time.
  • 2.6 MYA: Megaloceros has evolved by this time. Amphicyon becomes extinct after this time.

Quaternary Period: Gelasian Age

  • 2.58 MYA: Elasmotherium has evolved by this time. Eucladoceros becomes extinct after this time.
  • 2.5 MYA: Smilodon and Glyptodon have evolved by this time.
  • Off the Pacific coast of Costa Rica, volcanic activity creates some small islands. The southeastern island will come to be known as Isla Nublar, while the one to the northwest is called Isla Sorna. Eventually, the islands will come to be inhabited by numerous plants and animals. Beneath one of Isla Nublar’s volcanoes is a passageway to a subterranean ocean that has remained disconnected from the surface world for nearly two hundred million years.
    • Because these islands formed from the Cocos Plate, they are probably about as old as Cocos Island, which is between 1.91 and 2.44 million years old.
  • 2.2 MYA: Haast’s eagle (Hieraaetus moorei) may have evolved around this time.
  • 2 MYA: Meiolania, the marsupial lion (Thylacoleo), Gigantopithecus, and Doedicurus have evolved by this time. Deinotherium becomes extinct after this time.

Quaternary Period: Calabrian Age

  • 1.8 MYA: Arctodus has evolved by this time.
  • 1.6 MYA: Diprotodon has evolved by this time.
  • 1.5 MYA: The megalania (Varanus priscus) has evolved by this time. At roughly this time, the group of birds including the ancestors of the dodo (Raphus cucullatus) begin to split off of their ancestors.

Quaternary Period: Ionian/Chibanian Age

  • 781,000 BCE: Homo sapiens becomes prominent as a species around this time.
  • 400,000 BCE: The woolly mammoth has evolved by this time.
  • 300,000 BCE: Gigantopithecus becomes extinct after this time.
  • 48,000 BCE: Procoptodon has evolved by this time.
  • 44,000 BCE: Diprotodon and the marsupial lion (Thylacoleo) become extinct after this time.
  • 37,000 BCE: Elasmotherium becomes extinct after this time.
  • 16,000 BCE: Procoptodon becomes extinct after this time.
  • 12,500 BCE: Valley glaciers, including the Magda Glacier in what will eventually be Argentinian Patagonia, form around this period of time.

Quaternary Period: Tarantian Age

  • 10,000 BCE: Smilodon becomes extinct after this time.

Quaternary Period: Greenlandian Age

  • 9050 BCE: EremotheriumCastoroidesGlyptodonArctodus, and Doedicurus become extinct after this time.
  • 8550 BCE: Cattle are domesticated.
  • 8050 BCE: The mastodon (Mammut) and Macrauchenia become extinct after this time.
  • 8000 BCE: The goat is domesticated. The woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis) becomes extinct after this time.

Quaternary Period: Northgrippian Age

  • 6000 BCE: Megatherium becomes extinct after this time.
  • 5700 BCE: Megaloceros becomes extinct after this time.

Quaternary Period: Meghalayan Age

  • The Meghalayan Age begins 4,200 years before the present day (2250 BCE). All events in the timeline from this point onward until further notice occur in the Meghalayan Age and are listed under the year according to the Gregorian calendar. These dates are year CE unless otherwise specified.

2000 BCE

  • The woolly mammoth becomes extinct, relict populations surviving until now on Wrangel Island.
  • The megalania becomes extinct.

1000 BCE

  • At some point, indigenous people from Central America come to live on Isla Nublar. This includes a tribe of Boruca people. They may have arrived as early as the first millennium BCE. During recorded history, a volcano in the northeast of Isla Nublar erupts violently, emptying its magma chamber and collapsing. Its interior, while almost inaccessible, becomes known as La Caldera del Diablo in the Spanish language; the Boruca people consider it cursed and avoid it.

About 50 BCE

  • Meiolania has become extinct.

1400

  • Haast’s eagle (Hieraaetus moorei) becomes extinct around this time.

1525

  • First European contact with Isla Nublar, according to S/F canon.

1526

  • Commonly accepted date for European discovery of Isla Sorna, according to S/F canon.

1662

  • The dodo (Raphus cucullatus) was last sighted this year, and likely became extinct shortly after.

1760

  • The dodo (Raphus cucullatus) is scientifically described.

1789

  • Orthoceras is described.

1792

  • The mastodon (Mammut) is described, originally within the genus Elephas.

1796

  • Megatherium is described.

1799

  • The woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius) is scientifically described.

1801

  • Baculites is described.

1808

  • Elasmotherium is described.

1809

  • Pterodactylus is described.

1816

  • Geosaurus is described, originally as a species of Lacerta.

1821

  • Plesiosaurus is described.

1822

  • Mosasaurus is described.

1824

  • Megalosaurus is described.

1825

  • Iguanodon is described.

1828

  • Megaloceros is described.
  • Mastodonsaurus is described.

1829

  • Deinotherium is described.

1830

  • Metriorhynchus is described.

1831

  • Rhamphorhynchus is described, originally as a species of Pterodactylus.
  • Scaphognathus is described, originally as a species of Pterodactylus.
  • The woolly rhinoceros (Coelodonta antiquitatis) is described

1833

  • Chalicotherium is described.

1835

  • Enchodus is described.

1836

  • Amphicyon is described.

1837

  • Hybodus is described.

1838

  • Hyaenodon is described.
  • Diprotodon is described.
  • Castoroides is described.
  • Macrauchenia is described.

1839

  • Basilosaurus is described. Efforts to rename it Zeuglodon, after discovering that it is a whale rather than a reptile, fail because the original name is given precedence in zoological nomenclature.
  • Glyptodon is described.

1840

  • Rhizodus is described.

1842

  • Smilodon is described.
  • Pliosaurus is described.
  • Eremotherium is described.
  • The giant orthocone (Cameroceras) is described.

1843

  • The megalodon (Carcharocles megalodon) is scientifically described, originally in the genus Carcharodon.
  • Orthacanthus is described.

1845

  • Coryphodon is described.
  • Procoptodon is described.

1846

  • Dakosaurus is described, originally as a species of Geosaurus.

1847

  • Doedicurus is described.

1849

  • Cladophlebis is described.

1850

  • Archaeotherium is described.

1854

  • Arthropleura is described.
  • Arctodus is described.
  • Rhomaleosaurus is described, originally as a species of Plesiosaurus.

1855

  • Gastornis is described.

1856

  • Troodon is described. It will eventually be considered dubious.
  • Edestus is described.

1857

  • Protosphyraena is described.

1858

  • Psephoderma is described.

1859

  • Compsognathus is described.
  • Dimorphodon is described.
  • The megalania (Varanus priscus) is described, originally as Megalania prisca.
  • The marsupial lion (Thylacoleo) is described.

1861

  • Ornithocheirus is described, originally as a species of Pterodactylus.

1868

  • Elasmosaurus is described.
  • Eucladoceros is described.
  • Amebelodon is described.

1869

  • DNA is discovered, though it will not be understood properly for decades.
  • Platecarpus is described.
  • Sarcosuchus is described, originally as a species of Crocodylus.

1870

  • Xiphactinus is described.
  • Megacerops is described, originally as the genus Brontotherium.

1871

  • Uintatherium is described.

1872

  • Tylosaurus is described.
  • Protostega is described.
  • Haast’s eagle (Hieraaetus moorei) is described, originally in the genus Harpagornis.

1873

  • Dunkleosteus is described, originally as a species of Dinichthys.
  • Liopleurodon is described.

1874

  • Ophthalmosaurus is described.
  • Mauisaurus is described.
  • Coloborhynchus is described.

1875

  • Gillicus is described.

1876

  • Pteranodon is described.
  • Shonisaurus is described.

1877

  • Allosaurus is described.
  • Apatosaurus is described.
  • Dimetrodon is described, originally as a species of Clepsydrops.
  • Eryops is described, originally as the genus Glaukerpeton.
  • Stegosaurus is described.
  • Diplocaulus is described.

1878

  • Diplodocus is described.
  • Dryosaurus is described, originally as a species of Laosaurus.
  • Daeodon is described.
  • Ophiacodon is described.
  • Secodontosaurus is described, originally as the genus Theropleura.

1882

  • Edaphosaurus is described.

1884

  • Ceratosaurus is described.
  • Plesiosuchus is described.

1885

  • Hainosaurus is described.

1887

  • Peltephilus is described.
  • Phorusrhacos is described.

1888

  • Trinacromerum is described.

1889

  • Triceratops is described.
  • Temnodontosaurus is described.
  • Leedsichthys is described.
  • Prognathodon is described.
  • Nodosaurus is described.

1890

  • Styxosaurus is described.
  • Ornithomimus is described.
  • Metoposaurus is described.
  • Suchodus is described.

1891

  • Torosaurus is described.

1892

  • Anomalocaris is described.
  • Purussaurus is described.

1895

  • Shastasaurus is described.

1898

  • Tusoteuthis is described.

1899

  • Helicoprion is described.
  • Zalmoxes is described, originally as a species of Mochlodon.

1901

  • Moeritherium is described.
  • Gigantophis is described.

1902

  • Dolichorhynchops is described.
  • Arsinoitherium is described.

1903

  • Brachiosaurus is described.

1905

  • Tyrannosaurus is described.
  • Albertosaurus is described.
  • Onchopristis is described, originally as the genus Gigantichthys.

1908

  • Ankylosaurus is described.
  • Paraceratherium is described. This genus will eventually include species originally identified as Indricotherium.

1909

  • Deinosuchus is described.

1910

  • Euoplocephalus is described.

1911

  • Leptocleidus is described, originally as a species of Plesiosaurus.
  • Moschops is described.
  • Limnoscelis is described.

1912

  • Gryposuchus is described.

1913

  • John Hammond is born this year in Edinburgh, Scotland according to S/F canon.

1914

  • Corythosaurus is described.
  • Arctops is described.
  • Gorgosaurus is described.

1915

  • Spinosaurus is described.
  • Kentrosaurus is described.

1917

  • Edmontosaurus is described.

1922

  • Parasaurolophus is described.
  • Inostrancevia is described.
  • Scutosaurus is described, originally within the genus Pareiasaurus.

1924

  • Velociraptor is described.
  • Kronosaurus is described.
  • Andrewsarchus is described.

1925

  • Carcharodontosaurus is described, originally as a species of Megalosaurus.
  • The colossal squid (Mesonychoteuthis hamiltoni) is discovered and scientifically described. Because squid fossils are rare, it is not known when the genus first evolved.
  • Microposaurus is described.

1928

  • The first form of reproductive cloning, called somatic-cell nuclear transfer, is performed using amphibian embryos.
  • Platybelodon is described.
  • Scolosaurus is described.

1932

  • Synthetoceras is described.
  • Ichthyostega is described.

1933

  • Thylacosmilus is described.

1935

  • Gigantopithecus is described.

1936

  • Proceratosaurus is described.
  • Henodus is described.

1938

  • Sarkastodon is described.
  • Prestosuchus is described.

1940

  • Bananogmius is described.

1942

  • Plotosaurus is described, originally called Kolposaurus.

1943

  • Pachycephalosaurus is described.

1948

  • Prionosuchus is described.

1949

  • November 7: Costa Rica’s present-day Constitution is published. Costa Rica probably acquired Isla Nublar and Isla Sorna sometime after this.

1950

  • Acrocanthosaurus is described.

1952

  • Acanthostega is described.

1954

  • Therizinosaurus is described.

1955

  • Majungasaurus is described.
  • Tarbosaurus is described.

1956

  • Aepycamelus is described.

1959

  • Arambourgiania is described, originally as the genus Titanopteryx.

1963

  • Urtinotherium is described.

1964

  • Metriacanthosaurus is described.
  • Dsungaripterus is described.

1966

  • April 15: Dr. Margaret Dayhoff of the National Biomedical Research Foundation uses a groundbreaking database of protein and nucleic acid sequences to pioneer the first-ever phylogenetic tree model.

1967

  • Simon Masrani is born to Sanjay Masrani and his wife in Mumbai, India, according to S/F canon.
  • Around this time, Alan Grant would have begun attending university for a degree in paleontology. While at university, he goes on one of his first paleontological digs in the Arizona badlands. In one of his chemistry courses, he learns how to hotwire a vehicle.

1968

  • Hyneria is described.

1969

  • Deinonychus is described.

1970

  • Dilophosaurus is described.
  • Tenontosaurus is described.
  • Deinocheirus is described.
  • Proterogyrinus is described.
  • Pterodaustro is described.

1972

  • Gallimimus is described.

1973

  • Masrani Global Corporation is founded this year by Sanjay Masrani, according to S/F canon.
  • Megistotherium is described.
  • Eudimorphodon is described.
  • Wuerhosaurus is described.

1975

  • International Genetic Technologies is founded by John Hammond. He is assisted by paleogeneticist Dr. Carol Milton. InGen’s main subsidiary is the Hammond Foundation. Benjamin Lockwood may have financed InGen for a period of time, based on S/F canon.
  • Quetzalcoatlus is described.

1976

  • Ouranosaurus is described.

1977

  • Tuojiangosaurus is described.

1979

  • Segnosaurus is described.
  • Maiasaura is described.

1982

  • InGen leases Isla Sorna from the Costa Rican government, based on S/F canon.
  • At some point, Dr. Alan Grant goes on a paleontological dig in the Liaoning Province of China where he also learns to build a small traditional rock garden.

1983

  • Stygimoloch is described.
  • Shunosaurus is described.
  • Latest possible birth date for Owen Grady, as he would have had to be at least 17 years old to join the U.S. Armed Forces in 2000.

1985

  • Kelly Malcolm is born to Dr. Ian Malcolm, based on S/F canon.
  • Claire Dearing is born by early-to-mid-1985, according to S/F canon.
  • InGen leases Isla Nublar for the purpose of building Jurassic Park, based on S/F canon. Local people are relocated to the mainland. De-extinction is successfully accomplished by Dr. Milton. Amber samples are brought from around the world to Isla Nublar.
  • InGen’s Chairman of the Board has an estate constructed in Isla Nublar’s north, designated the Green Zone. He begins work on dinosaurian EQ, breeding several species to test his theories.
  • Supersaurus is described.
  • Postosuchus is described.

1986

  • Baryonyx is described.
  • Dr. Henry Wu graduates with a PhD in genetics this spring, according to S/F canon. He is quickly hired by InGen and becomes a vital part of the company due to his groundbreaking research.
  • Because the half-life of DNA is short, many of the ancient DNA samples recovered by InGen are severely decayed and require extensive reconstruction to be viable. To make this process easier, Dr. Wu discovers ways to rearrange the ancient chromosomes to incorporate the DNA of modern amphibians in order to fill in the decayed segments. However, what he and the other scientists do not realize is that sometimes the genomes end up equally contaminated with the DNA of their insect sources, which causes unwanted harmful mutations.
  • Among the mutated dinosaurs is a Tyrannosaurus rex specimen eventually termed Ares 7. Because of the harmful DNA inclusions, it self-terminates in the embryonic stage. Dr. Wu keeps the specimen preserved for study.

1987

  • Tropeognathus is described.

1988

  • Tupuxuara is described.

1989

  • Tapejara is described.
  • At around this time, InGen purchases the underwater oil drilling rig BB-51, which is located in the East Pacific Ocean near a submarine wall rich in fossil remains. The rig is nicknamed “Big Blue” by InGen employees.

1991

  • Amargasaurus is described.
  • At some point, malaria is spread by mosquitoes to workers on Isla Nublar. A nonnative plant, sweet wormwood, is discovered on the island and is used to create antimalarial drugs. Stockpiles of sweet wormwood are now kept in the emergency shelters on Isla Nublar in case of an outbreak of malaria mosquitoes, and antimalarial drugs are prepared in case treatment is needed.

1993

  • A bottleneck pass is discovered leading into La Caldera del Diablo in Isla Nublar’s Chavarria Mountains. InGen Security and the Science Requisition Team convince Hammond to designate this area as Site C and set it aside for the Classified Projects division. The crater lake is drained via pipe installation. This site will be used for InGen’s Classified Projects division.
  • At some point, Project Baby T. rex begins. InGen’s Chairman is using this as an experiment to test the animal’s EQ as it grows in an effort to prove that the emotional intelligence of dinosaurs is higher than scientists previously assumed. The baby tyrannosaur is monitored and found to have high intelligence.
  • De-extinct animals begin breeding without InGen’s knowledge. This is due to the amphibian DNA used to fill their gene sequence gaps, which inadvertently made them capable of protogyny. They pass on their genetic heritage, including the harmful DNA inclusions which sometimes shorten their lifespans depending on how much mosquito DNA is expressed.
  • Jurassic Park fails due to events paralleling the S/F canon’s 1993 incident. Many of the specimens are lost, and most of the park facilities are demolished. The Green Zone remains mostly intact. Site C is abandoned in an incomplete state, and Big Blue is likewise abandoned without having been made functional.
  • Hurricane Clarissa forces the abandonment of Site B on Isla Sorna.
  • Dr. Milton leaves the Jurassic Park project to work in Cenozoic de-extinction. She falls out of touch with InGen’s administrators.
  • InGen develops the state-of-the-art cargo ship S.S. Arc Atlantic for mass animal transport. It is used by Dr. Milton, who spends the better part of a year on an Antarctic expedition performing mammalian de-extinction.
  • Utahraptor is described. InGen had already discovered this species prior to its scientific description.
  • Odobenocetops is described.
  • Argentinosaurus is described.
  • Monolophosaurus is described.

1994

  • Pelecanimimus is described.
  • Zhejiangopterus is described.
  • Einiosaurus is described.
  • Schmeissneria is described.

1995

  • Giganotosaurus is described.

1996

  • Irritator is described.

1997

  • Koolasuchus is described.
  • Tupandactylus is described, originally within the genus Tapejara.
  • The public learns about de-extinction due to events paralleling the S/F canon’s 1997 incident. John Hammond, his health recovering, is permitted by InGen’s Board of Directors to attempt Jurassic Park a second time. He enlists two of his original consultants, Drs. Alan Grant and Ian Malcolm, to advise on its construction. Malcolm’s daughter Kelly joins in order to advertise the Park and perform public outreach using her budding photography skills. Also returning is Dr. Wu.
  • Dr. Ian Malcolm releases papers regarding his research on Isla Sorna which reveals how the dinosaurs were able to survive. This includes information on the dinosaurs’ protogyny.
  • Scientists discover that the Magda Glacier is receding by approximately ten inches per year, with the ice sheets themselves reducing in size by six feet per year. Veins of ice rich in animal remains are found in the glacier.
  • Aquatic Park, a branch of the Jurassic Park brand, opens on the seafloor of the Cocos Plate somewhat near the unfinished BB-51 oil rig. The rig’s exact location is unknown to most Park staff, but is rumored to be near an underwater sculpture. The existence of the fossil wall is also kept secret from most staff members due to Hammond’s fear that InGen’s SRT will take advantage of it.
  • Glacier Park, a branch of the Jurassic Park brand, opens on the Patagonian coast within Los Glaciares National Park near the Magda valley glacier.

1998

  • May 17: Masrani Global Corporation makes an official press release about their acquisition of InGen. The two corporations have entered into a definitive merge agreement, in which Masrani Global Corporation will buy out InGen for $41 million. The total enterprise of InGen, including the Park facilities, has a value of $2.3 billion. The Boards of both companies have unanimously approved the sale to be accretive immediately upon the U.S. court-ordered dissolution of the Hammond Foundation. Simon Masrani speaks at the press conference saying “The proposed acquisition of InGen demonstrates our continued commitment to create shareholder value while incrementing revenue and EPS before the next fiscal year. As the new millennium approaches, there has been an unprecedented growth of technology and today, with our new partners at InGen, Masrani Global will position itself at the forefront of exciting scientific innovations. I am especially pleased to welcome Jurassic Park to our company portfolio of world-class brands. We have exciting developments to announce for this property in the months ahead.”
  • Suchomimus is described.
  • Sonorasaurus is described.
  • Eolambia is described.
  • Sometime after the InGen buyout, John Hammond passes away.

1999

  • Zach Mitchell is born this year according to S/F canon.

2000

  • Pyroraptor is described.
  • At some point, Dr. Wu discovers the cause behind some of the dinosaurs’ drastically reduced lifespans. The unwanted mosqutio DNA inclusions had caused harmful mutations in some of the animals, but not all of them; this is because the genes causing these mutations are not expressed in all animals. Some are asymptomatic carriers, and some do not possess the harmful inclusions at all. While he will need to work on a way to identify which are carriers and which are not, the problem does inspire him to seek ways to use genetic hybridization to give beneficial traits instead. In the meantime, Jurassic Park’s animals are being used as surrogate mothers for new animals in the new park, Jurassic World.
  • Owen Grady enlists in the United States Navy. He works in MK 9 of the Marine Mammal Program, spending three years stationed around the world in locations such as Pearl Harbor, Hawaii training bottlenose dolphins and other marine animals. He becomes a first lieutenant, eventually meeting Barry Sembène of the French Navy. The two men work well together and become friends.

2001

  • Hauffiosaurus is described.
  • Vic Hoskins is hired as the head of InGen Security, according to S/F canon.

2002

  • January 29: Masrani Global Corporation makes an official press release regarding the completion of an artificial hybrid genome for a new prototype. It’s stated to be a coelurosaurian theropod created by modifying the DNA of multiple different carnivorous dinosaurs. The genus is as of now unnamed, but has been codenamed Project Theia; Dr. Wu speaks at the press release, saying “This is a scientific breakthrough for all of us. The importance of this particular genome composition to the field of genetic engineering cannot be overstated. Theia represents the latest step toward rebuilding our original vision—one that many have anxiously been waiting for—and our latest success boldly validates the direction we are moving in.”
  • Hatzegopteryx is described.
  • Kaiwhekea is described.

2003

  • Rajasaurus is described.
  • An incident occurs in the Persian Gulf involving MK 9. The team and its dolphins are dispatched on a minesweeping mission to make the passage safe. During the mission, Grady’s ship’s radar picks up a small object heading straight for it; tensions in the area are high and it is briefly assumed to be a torpedo or small enemy ship. The ship’s captain makes a last-minute decision not to engage, realizing that the bogey is likely one of their dolphins. While this split-second call saved the life of the dolphin, the incident brings the Marine Mammal Program under scrutiny and MK 9’s effectiveness is called into question.
  • MK 9 is recalled to the United States the following day, and is subject to a government investigation. The questioning is intentionally designed to discredit MK 9 for political reasons, due to the upcoming U.S. presidential election and the growing popularity of drones in warfare rather than military animals.
  • The day after the investigation, the news begins to run stories about “defective” dolphins jeopardizing missions, and MK 9 is ordered to cease all activities and disband. Grady suspects that the National Security Council sent the relevant information to the news media in order to further pressure against the Marine Mammal Program in favor of drones. Grady volunteers to his captain to take the fall for MK 9 and safely relocate the dolphins; he announces on television that the Marine Mammal Program is being phased out by 2017. The relocation of his dolphins is accomplished with the help of Masrani Global Corporation, making Grady known to Vic Hoskins.
  • All the expenses of the dolphin relocation are covered by Masrani Global in exchange for Grady’s potential employment (however, most sources state that he was not actually hired until 2012). A court-martial is staged with the U.S. Navy to explain Grady’s being discharged to the public, though the court-martial goes on his permanent record.

2004

  • Gray Mitchell is born.
    • It should be noted that Gray’s exact date of birth is slightly different than in S/F canon. In the film canon, Gray had not yet been born as of early September 2004, whereas in the mobile canon, he is explicitly stated to be eleven years old as of July 2015.
  • Bonitasaura is described.
  • Unaysaurus is described.

2005

  • Tyrannotitan is described.
  • Tanycolagreus is described.

2006

  • Dracorex is described.
  • Guanlong is described.
  • Antarctopelta is described.
  • Umoonasaurus is described.

2007

  • Kelenken is described. Though remains were discovered in 1999, InGen had already discovered this species as of 1997.

2009

  • Kaprosuchus is described. InGen had already discovered this species as of 1997.
  • Titanoboa is described. InGen had already discovered this species as of 1997.
  • Miragaia is described.

2010

  • Darwinopterus is described.
  • Sinoceratops is described.
  • Concavenator is described.
  • Livyatan is described, originally as Leviathan. InGen had already discovered this species as of 1997.
  • Alanqa is described.
  • Sagaria is described.

2012

  • Yutyrannus is described.
  • Carbonemys is described.
  • Aerotitan is described.
  • Ostafrikasaurus is described.

2013

  • Nasutoceratops is described. InGen had already discovered this species as of 1997.
  • Lythronax is described.

2014

  • Dreadnoughtus is described. InGen had already discovered this species as of 1997.
  • Nundasuchus is described.

2019

  • Bajadasaurus is described. InGen is already in possession of its DNA.